The Best Way to Shade Earth

Scientific American reported on ACOM scientist Simone Tilmes' experiments with geoengineering. The eruption of Mt. Pinatubo in June 1991 demonstrated that sulfur aerosols have a cooling effect by shading the earth's surface. The study found that harmful side effects (droughts, extreme rainfall) could be minimized by injecting particles into the atmosphere by airplane at 15° north latitude and 30° south. Those latitudes away from the equator provide better atmospheric mixing.

Reported by John Fialka, E&E News on July 5, 2018.

Article URL: 
https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-best-way-to-shade-earth/
Thumbnail: 
The June 12, 1991 eruption column from Mount Pinatubo taken from the east side of Clark Air Base. U.S. Geological Survey Photograph taken on June 12, 1991, 08:51 hours, by Dave Harlow.

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